Get Your Pretty On With Creative Storage Ideas

In my home, I have an old-fashioned hotel key box which I use to hold photos.  Fabulous!

  • Image result for old fashioned hotel key holder

Find a drying rack (the one our great grandmothers were forced to use) and display throws, scarves, purses (you get the idea).

Wooden crates make great bookshelves for Gen Y (who love their lofts) and Millennials (who despite asking Mom & Dad for money) live modestly and these enclosed shipping crates make a terrific room divider.

Baskets, Baskets, Baskets!  Look cute holding potatoes, onions, and other items we stock in a pantry.

Old style tin metals hold your knitting, cards and dice, jewelry and baubles.  Simply think outside of the box (I mean tin).

Give Those Windows a Double-Take

 

I Candy

Forget what your mother told you about staring.

Get interiors that you can’t take your eyes off of.  Designs that are drop-dead gorgeous.  From furniture and accessories, wall coverings to window treatments.  Laura Buhrer Interiors can help you create rooms that promise a double-take. (Jill Bagby)

 

                                                     

 

Farmgirl in Heels or Why Americans Are Fascinated by Scandinavian Design

The areas of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden have left indelible marks of the world of design.  With distinct pairings of soft blues and whites, weathered wood, large paned windows, and painted furniture, causes many a savvy homeowner to fall in love.  The fifth wall (or ceiling) in may Scandinavian homes receives special attention whether barn-boarded, beamed, or a soothing white gloss.  Window treatments tend to be sparse or skipped all together.  Since, traditionally, Gustavian furniture is painted, distressed and finished are typically in white, parchment, gold, and exposed antique pine, homeowners attempting to copy this style often find flea markets and antique stores as their best sources for materials.  Wall art can range from originals to abstracts, from lithographs to unframed oils.  Accessories tend to be well-edited so as not to interfere with the tranquility of the overall use of any room.  Floors look best newly sanded with a white stain or carefully selected tiles.  The outdoors brought in exemplifies a Scandinavian home so strategically place living greenery and flowery plants around every living area.  Give existing furniture a face lift by sanding and adding lighter colors such as buttermilk or gray blue to keep with the scheme.  Fabrics in raw linen and neutral colors create a warmth that appeals to those that want the feel of that region in the world.  Vintage wood, a beautiful Swedish clock, vintage crockery, apothecary jars, metal bins, canopy beds, a wood abacus, wall niches with shelves all serve to not only transform your home but also creates a lovely spot reflective on that perfect Hans Christian Anderson morning.

The Yoko Factor or BoHo in SoHo

Boho Chic is a style of design that fits perfectly with the just graduated, don’t have much money, can use a paint brush, addicted to Pinterest kind of gal.  The vibrancy of colors, the play on fabrics, the mix of textures, the wind chimes…….Boho tends to be a jumble of mid-century modern, hippi dippity,  shabby chic , cottage, flea market, Middle-Eastern, with a nod to Mary Quant kind of look.

The Bohemian Style embraces a sense of freedom from conventional design and infuses what we picture to be the European Gypsy look.  Usually referring to an unconventional and certainly artistic life, one thinks of free spirits who love this genre.  Anyone with a good case of OCD may want to skip this unconventional approach to living but for those that love those 64 box crayons…Fill your space from top to bottom with a bold and energetic palette.

 To achieve this style, one must mix old with new, vintage with modern, lacquered with weathered.  In other words, throw everything including the kitchen toaster into the pot.  The idea of achieving variety and diversity in color and form requires thinking outside the box (and drilling a whole lot holes in one’s walls).  Use books, fabrics, braided rugs, funky lighting, pillows, throws, plants, lamps, and sculpture to express your individuality (and don’t forget the handmade).   And as a nod to Mother Nature never hurts with REAL plants and herbs playing a central role.

I find the eclectic look works best in small spaces, cozy nooks, and tiny apartments where young people travel to after their formative college years.  BoHo is also a great way to avoid cleaning as it’s expression usually involves a great deal of clutter.   For me, I visualize a budget friendly indie recipe with a smattering of charm.  Think Yoko Ono.  Break it up, hold a love-in, and screech out a few records.

 

 

Can’t Fix Crazy or the Art of Design When Bored

Obsession, thy name is ironstone or perfume from Calvin Klein.  First manufactured in Staffordshire, England in the early 1800s, these gorgeous white piece of sheer beauty rock my world as much as my awesome but totally unexceptional life.  Usually, many stylists and home interior designers (including myself) combine these creamy concoctions with other patterns.  I personally chose a hunt scene pattern in chocolate browns.  Now my life tends to revolve around Chicago P.D., my 16 year old cat, and my attempts to be a world famous beautifier (so much so that Starbucks seems like a chore), that this desire to collect plates may seem a tad silly.  I prefer displaying in armoires or open shelving but how easily it may duplicated by looking at any magazine tear.

Now I am a fan of minimal clutter (yes, I know, an oxymoron) but I do tend to gravitate to cleaner lines in furniture, with perhaps a bit of the chippy, distressed thing but wildly unexpected accessories add that needed punch that separates the girls from the women. 

No I know I appear all hip and wise (yes, yes I do) but in reality, HGTV as covered most of my incredibly self-perceptive issues.  When my nails are not drying (still can’t figure out the home gel), I sit at a keyboard (wishing it was a typewriter) and think of cute but totally irrelevant titles.  HEY THEN THE FUN BEGINS!

Now since I assume you all are dying to know about those little items that magically forces my ATM card to fall out of my wallet, I will list and list and list.  Cowhide rugs (can’t resist them), French pillows, antique iron tools (never use them but…), knotty pine tables, gorgeous and outrageously priced lamps, solid bedding, signage (or from Hobby Lobby, who the hell can tell the difference), stacks of design and decorating books, and my children visiting their own homes.

Junkyard Dog

No this little missive has nothing to do with our furry friends, but with a book I recently purchased on the sales rack.  It’s a lovely read with glorious photos by Leslie Linsley  (between you and me, I would have paid full price).   The author delves into the ease of using “junk” or “salvage” items to give your home that farmhouse feel.  What did we do before Joanna Gaines?  Anyway, Leslie offers wonderful tips and cost-saving ideas on how to beautify your abode.  Starting with the unexpected (lol, I have always wanted to use that abbreviation when writing, you’re just lucky I didn’t add emojis)  reclaimed woods and beams (which are now premade by every flooring and tile company so skip the chill in New Hampshire) to add that certain patina that ages a home in a unique and creative way.  She, like many designers today, prefers a kitchen with open shelving and thus allowing for more areas of display.  (I assume they have cleaning people coming in once or twice a week).

Good lighting plays an important part in any room and one should occasional shock by doing the unexpected.  Personally I am huge fan of anything galvanized but I also fancy a lovely crystal chandelier. 

Try the unexpected like mixing wood with copper.  A proper industrial looking aged bronze fixture can not only be functional but a tremendously wonderful detail.  The author recommends using baskets and vintage tin boxes (here we come Hobby Lobby) to hold fruits, chocolates, tea bags.  And let’s not forget the apron sink and workable island.    Things to display include small appliances, wedding flatware, cookbooks, wooden spoons and bowls, vintage cookie presses, blue Mason jars, antique wire soap dishes, metal canisters, colanders, wall mounted wood spice racks, vintage teapots, enamelware, and chopping boards in wood (of course)  To go even further, you could mix and match your island stools, barring the fact that you have an island.  Leslie is a proponent of using open shelving on narrow walls which allows one to display collectibles such as breadboxes or scales.

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